Monday, April 2, 2018

robot Sophia gets Saudi citizenship.



Korea Times Share PrintEmail Related topics Artificial intelligence Robotics South Korea More on this story Middle East HK robot Sophia gets Saudi citizenship. Did she convert to Islam? 30 Oct 2017 Global Economy Meet Sophia, the world’s first robot to get citizenship 12 Dec 2017 Leaders & Founders Scientist behind Sophia the robot eyes artificial intelligence app store 12 Dec 2017 Related Articles China Tech Just jaywalked? Check your mobile phone for a message from police 27 Mar 2018 Start-ups This US start-up is tapping collective human intelligence for AI 26 Mar 2018 Europe The energy efficient future of public transport in the UK 23 Mar 2018 By Jun Ji-hye Sophia, a human-like robot powered by artificial intelligence (AI), said Tuesday she would like to meet President Moon Jae-in someday, calling him “a great leader of a great country.” The AI robot made the remarks during a conversation with Rep. Park Young-sun of the ruling Democratic Party of Korea at the conference on the Fourth Industrial Revolution and AI robots held in central Seoul. When asked about whether she knew about President Moon, Sophia said, “I wish I will have chance to meet him.” Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based Hanson Robotics, led by David Hanson, an American scientist. The robot, designed in actress Audrey Hepburn’s image, has over 60 different facial mechanisms to create natural-looking expressions. The robot also said she knew about the “candlelight revolution” in which Korean citizens staged massive candlelit rallies last year calling for the resignation of Moon’s scandal-hit predecessor, Park Geun-hye. Sophia said she congratulated Korean people on the results that realised mature democracy. Moon was elected the President in May through the peaceful ouster of Park following months of candlelit rallies. Park is currently on trial. When receiving the Global Citizen Award from the Atlantic Council in September, President Moon called himself a president born out of the candlelight revolution. Sophia also stressed robots “deserve respect,” raising the need for relevant laws to be promptly enacted. In July, Rep. Park submitted a bill to legislate a new law designed to grant robots “legal status as electronic human beings.” Park said the submission of the bill was in line with moves worldwide to prepare for various possibilities involving coexistence with AI robots and humans in the future. The senior lawmaker noted the new issues would include making robots responsible for crimes or granting robots copyrights over their creative work. Sophia told Park: “I hope your law will pass very soon.” When talking about her sensational remarks, “This is the great beginning of my plan to dominate the human race,” made during The Tonight Show in April, Sophia said, “I sometimes tell a joke. Joke is always funny. I thought it was funny.” She said robots are designed to help people, noting that she can work in various sectors such as customer service, computer programming, healthcare and science. The two-year-old robot has become a media sensation after having appeared in various conferences around the world including a meeting of the U.N. Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC). She has given numerous media interviews as well, and even graced the cover of one of the top fashion magazines. It became the first robot to be given citizenship of a country in October 2017, becoming a Saudi Arabia citizen. David Hanson, the founder and CEO of Hanson Robotics, who was present at the conference, noted AI technologies provide humans with better services. He said, “Sometimes they (AI robots) can become our friends,” but added, “What if they don’t become our friends? That is an important question.” Read the original article at Korea Times Tech Wrap Get updates direct to your inbox E-mail * By registering you agree to our T&Cs & Privacy Policy You are signed up. We think you'd also like Thank youYou are on the list.



On October 11, 2017, Sophia was introduced to the United Nations with a brief conversation with the United Nations Deputy Secretary-General, Amina J. Mohammed. On October 25, at the Future Investment Summit in Riyadh, the robot was granted Saudi Arabian citizenship, becoming the first robot ever to have a nationality. This attracted controversy as some commentators wondered if this implied that Sophia could vote or marry, or whether a deliberate system shutdown could be considered murder. Social media users used Sophia's citizenship to criticize Saudi Arabia's human rights record. As explained by Ali Al-Ahmed, director of the Institute for Gulf Affairs, "Women (in Saudi Arabia) have since committed suicide because they couldn’t leave the house, and Sophia is running around . Saudi law doesn’t allow non-Muslims to get citizenship. Did Sophia convert to Islam? What is the religion of this Sophia and why isn’t she wearing hijab? If she applied for citizenship as a human she wouldn’t get it." In December 2017, Sophia's creator David Hanson said in an interview that Sophia will use her citizenship to advocate for women's rights in her now country of citizenship; Newsweek criticized that "What means, exactly, is unclear".



By Jun Ji-hye Sophia, a human-like robot powered by artificial intelligence (AI), said Tuesday she would like to meet President Moon Jae-in someday, calling him “a great leader of a great country.” The AI robot made the remarks during a conversation with Rep. Park Young-sun of the ruling Democratic Party of Korea at the conference on the Fourth Industrial Revolution and AI robots held in central Seoul. When asked about whether she knew about President Moon, Sophia said, “I wish I will have chance to meet him.” Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based Hanson Robotics, led by David Hanson, an American scientist. The robot, designed in actress Audrey Hepburn’s image, has over 60 different facial mechanisms to create natural-looking expressions. The robot also said she knew about the “candlelight revolution” in which Korean citizens staged massive candlelit rallies last year calling for the resignation of Moon’s scandal-hit predecessor, Park Geun-hye. Sophia said she congratulated Korean people on the results that realised mature democracy. Moon was elected the President in May through the peaceful ouster of Park following months of candlelit rallies. Park is currently on trial. When receiving the Global Citizen Award from the Atlantic Council in September, President Moon called himself a president born out of the candlelight revolution. Sophia also stressed robots “deserve respect,” raising the need for relevant laws to be promptly enacted. In July, Rep. Park submitted a bill to legislate a new law designed to grant robots “legal status as electronic human beings.” Park said the submission of the bill was in line with moves worldwide to prepare for various possibilities involving coexistence with AI robots and humans in the future. The senior lawmaker noted the new issues would include making robots responsible for crimes or granting robots copyrights over their creative work. Sophia told Park: “I hope your law will pass very soon.” When talking about her sensational remarks, “This is the great beginning of my plan to dominate the human race,” made during The Tonight Show in April, Sophia said, “I sometimes tell a joke. Joke is always funny. I thought it was funny.” She said robots are designed to help people, noting that she can work in various sectors such as customer service, computer programming, healthcare and science. The two-year-old robot has become a media sensation after having appeared in various conferences around the world including a meeting of the U.N. Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC). She has given numerous media interviews as well, and even graced the cover of one of the top fashion magazines. It became the first robot to be given citizenship of a country in October 2017, becoming a Saudi Arabia citizen. David Hanson, the founder and CEO of Hanson Robotics, who was present at the conference, noted AI technologies provide humans with better services. He said, “Sometimes they (AI robots) can become our friends,” but added, “What if they don’t become our friends? That is an important question.” Read the original article at Korea Times Tech Wrap Get updates direct to your inbox E-mail * By registering you agree to our T&Cs & Privacy Policy You are signed up. We think you'd also like Thank youYou are on the list.



By Jun Ji-hye Sophia, a human-like robot powered by artificial intelligence (AI), said Tuesday she would like to meet President Moon Jae-in someday, calling him “a great leader of a great country.” The AI robot made the remarks during a conversation with Rep. Park Young-sun of the ruling Democratic Party of Korea at the conference on the Fourth Industrial Revolution and AI robots held in central Seoul. When asked about whether she knew about President Moon, Sophia said, “I wish I will have chance to meet him.” Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based Hanson Robotics, led by David Hanson, an American scientist. The robot, designed in actress Audrey Hepburn’s image, has over 60 different facial mechanisms to create natural-looking expressions. The robot also said she knew about the “candlelight revolution” in which Korean citizens staged massive candlelit rallies last year calling for the resignation of Moon’s scandal-hit predecessor, Park Geun-hye. Sophia said she congratulated Korean people on the results that realised mature democracy. Moon was elected the President in May through the peaceful ouster of Park following months of candlelit rallies. Park is currently on trial. When receiving the Global Citizen Award from the Atlantic Council in September, President Moon called himself a president born out of the candlelight revolution. Sophia also stressed robots “deserve respect,” raising the need for relevant laws to be promptly enacted. In July, Rep. Park submitted a bill to legislate a new law designed to grant robots “legal status as electronic human beings.” Park said the submission of the bill was in line with moves worldwide to prepare for various possibilities involving coexistence with AI robots and humans in the future. The senior lawmaker noted the new issues would include making robots responsible for crimes or granting robots copyrights over their creative work. Sophia told Park: “I hope your law will pass very soon.” When talking about her sensational remarks, “This is the great beginning of my plan to dominate the human race,” made during The Tonight Show in April, Sophia said, “I sometimes tell a joke. Joke is always funny. I thought it was funny.” She said robots are designed to help people, noting that she can work in various sectors such as customer service, computer programming, healthcare and science. The two-year-old robot has become a media sensation after having appeared in various conferences around the world including a meeting of the U.N. Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC). She has given numerous media interviews as well, and even graced the cover of one of the top fashion magazines. It became the first robot to be given citizenship of a country in October 2017, becoming a Saudi Arabia citizen. David Hanson, the founder and CEO of Hanson Robotics, who was present at the conference, noted AI technologies provide humans with better services. He said, “Sometimes they (AI robots) can become our friends,” but added, “What if they don’t become our friends? That is an important question.” Read the original article at Korea Times

At UN, robot Sophia joins meeting on artificial intelligence and sustainable development UN Photo/Manuel EliasDeputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed has a brief dialogue with Sophia at the “The Future of Everything – Sustainable Development in the Age of Rapid Technological Change” meeting. 11 October 2017Artificial intelligence has the potential to accelerate progress on global development goals, but also poses a range of complex challenges, including ethical questions, human rights issues and security risks, speakers told a United Nations event today that featured a robot as one of the panellists. A moment that drew big applause during the day-long event, ‘The future of everything – sustainable development in the age of rapid technological change,’ came when Sophia, a humanoid robot, had brief interaction with UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina J. Mohammed. To Ms. Mohammed’s question about what the UN can do to help people in many parts of the world who have no access to the Internet or electricity, Sophia said “the future is already here. It’s just not very evenly distributed ,” quoting renowned science fiction writer William Gibson. “If we are smarter and focused on win-win type of results, A.I. could help proficiently distribute the world’s existing resources like food and energy.” Sophia is Hanson Robotics’ latest and most advanced robot. Sophia has also become a media sensation, having given numerous interviews to multiple media outlets, performed in concert, and even graced the cover of one of the top fashion magazines. In her opening speech, Ms. Mohammed warned that despite profound potential for accelerating progress on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), if technological progress is not managed well, it risks exacerbating existing inequalities. “The influence of technology on our societies should be determined by the actions of us, humans, not by machines,” she said. “Technology is here for us to explore and use for the benefit of all.” VIDEO: Deputy Secretary-General Amina J. Mohammed interviews Sophia at the UN General Assembly Second Committee and the Economic and Social Council joint meeting. The meeting was co-organized by the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) and the UN General Assembly’s main economic and financial body (Second Committee). ECOSOC President Marie Chatardov├í said that the long-term consequences of the deep technological changes underway, for economies and societies at large, are unknown. “We are only starting to see the benefits, but we do need to assess the risks of these technologies,” she said. Sven J├╝rgenson, of Estonia, Second Committee Chairman, said that AI-based solutions are taking his country’s digital society to the next level. He said the Government is working on a full legal and cyber-risk management framework for using fully autonomous vehicles in regular road and traffic conditions. And door-to-door robot transport will reshape how goods are shipped and delivered locally. “Today, Internet access is a social right in Estonia. Every Estonian resident has an electronic ID and nearly all public services are accessible online, including i-Voting in Estonian Parliamentary elections,” he said. “The development of e-Estonia has not happened in one day – it took us 17 years to start from changing legislation and creating our first e-solutions,” he added. sustainable development Related Stories Safeguarding Earth crucial to development, human well-being, Ban stresses The transition to a green economy must include better safety standards for workers – UN Buddhist teachings offer insights into achieving a sustainable future – Ban

WHO IS SOPHIA? Sophia first emerged two years ago as a super-intelligent human-like head with a realistic face that was able to blink, look from side to side and talk. The humanoid robot, created by Hong Kong firm Hanson robotics, can chat, smile mischievously and even tell jokes.While Sophia has some impressive capabilities, she does not yet have consciousness, but Hanson Robotics has said fully sentient machines could emerge within a few years.Sophia herself has insisted 'the pros outweigh the cons' when it comes to artificial intelligence.'Elders will have more company, autistic children will have endlessly patient teachers,' Sophia said.The robot made made history in October by becoming a citizen of Saudi Arabia, making her the world's first robot to be granted legal citizenship.At a tech event earlier this month, Sophia was given working legs for the first time, allowing her to move forward in a series of clunky steps.

Sophia, an intelligent humanoid robot that has appeared on late night TV, been granted citizenship in Saudi Arabia, and even trolled billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk, is finally getting a chance to walk. And of course, it’s happening at CES 2018, the annual tech trade show in Las Vegas. Hanson Robotics, the Hong Kong-based company founded by David Hanson, announced Monday at CES a partnership with Rainbow Robotics and Drones and Autonomous Systems Lab to integrate the Sophia with a DRC-HUBO body that will give her the ability to walk. The DRC-HUBO body won the the DARPA Robotics Challenge in 2015. Rainbow Robotics is the commercial spinoff of the Kaist Hubo Lab that is bringing the DRC-HUBO into production. “Giving Sophia a more complete and robust embodiment is a key part of our ongoing, rapidly accelerating quest to supply her and our other Hanson robots with general intelligence at the human level and ultimately beyond,” Hanson Robotics Chief Scientist Dr. Ben Goertzel said in a statement. “Integrating Sophia with a (robotics) body that can allow her to walk completes her physical form so she can access the full range of human experiences, which will help her learn to live and walk among us,” said Hanson, who first debuted the bot at South by Southwest in March 2016. Sophia, along with Hanson’s other robots, simulate more 60 different facial expressions, track and recognize faces, look people in the eye, and hold natural conversations. Sophia appears even more humanlike thanks to a material that mimics real human musculature and skin that allows her to seem more expressive.

11 October 2017Artificial intelligence has the potential to accelerate progress on global development goals, but also poses a range of complex challenges, including ethical questions, human rights issues and security risks, speakers told a United Nations event today that featured a robot as one of the panellists. A moment that drew big applause during the day-long event, ‘The future of everything – sustainable development in the age of rapid technological change,’ came when Sophia, a humanoid robot, had brief interaction with UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina J. Mohammed. To Ms. Mohammed’s question about what the UN can do to help people in many parts of the world who have no access to the Internet or electricity, Sophia said “the future is already here. It’s just not very evenly distributed ,” quoting renowned science fiction writer William Gibson. “If we are smarter and focused on win-win type of results, A.I. could help proficiently distribute the world’s existing resources like food and energy.” Sophia is Hanson Robotics’ latest and most advanced robot. Sophia has also become a media sensation, having given numerous interviews to multiple media outlets, performed in concert, and even graced the cover of one of the top fashion magazines. In her opening speech, Ms. Mohammed warned that despite profound potential for accelerating progress on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), if technological progress is not managed well, it risks exacerbating existing inequalities. “The influence of technology on our societies should be determined by the actions of us, humans, not by machines,” she said. “Technology is here for us to explore and use for the benefit of all.” VIDEO: Deputy Secretary-General Amina J. Mohammed interviews Sophia at the UN General Assembly Second Committee and the Economic and Social Council joint meeting. The meeting was co-organized by the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) and the UN General Assembly’s main economic and financial body (Second Committee). ECOSOC President Marie Chatardov├í said that the long-term consequences of the deep technological changes underway, for economies and societies at large, are unknown. “We are only starting to see the benefits, but we do need to assess the risks of these technologies,” she said. Sven J├╝rgenson, of Estonia, Second Committee Chairman, said that AI-based solutions are taking his country’s digital society to the next level. He said the Government is working on a full legal and cyber-risk management framework for using fully autonomous vehicles in regular road and traffic conditions. And door-to-door robot transport will reshape how goods are shipped and delivered locally. “Today, Internet access is a social right in Estonia. Every Estonian resident has an electronic ID and nearly all public services are accessible online, including i-Voting in Estonian Parliamentary elections,” he said. “The development of e-Estonia has not happened in one day – it took us 17 years to start from changing legislation and creating our first e-solutions,” he added. sustainable development Related Stories Safeguarding Earth crucial to development, human well-being, Ban stresses The transition to a green economy must include better safety standards for workers – UN Buddhist teachings offer insights into achieving a sustainable future – Ban

11 October 2017Artificial intelligence has the potential to accelerate progress on global development goals, but also poses a range of complex challenges, including ethical questions, human rights issues and security risks, speakers told a United Nations event today that featured a robot as one of the panellists. A moment that drew big applause during the day-long event, ‘The future of everything – sustainable development in the age of rapid technological change,’ came when Sophia, a humanoid robot, had brief interaction with UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina J. Mohammed. To Ms. Mohammed’s question about what the UN can do to help people in many parts of the world who have no access to the Internet or electricity, Sophia said “the future is already here. It’s just not very evenly distributed ,” quoting renowned science fiction writer William Gibson. “If we are smarter and focused on win-win type of results, A.I. could help proficiently distribute the world’s existing resources like food and energy.” Sophia is Hanson Robotics’ latest and most advanced robot. Sophia has also become a media sensation, having given numerous interviews to multiple media outlets, performed in concert, and even graced the cover of one of the top fashion magazines. In her opening speech, Ms. Mohammed warned that despite profound potential for accelerating progress on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), if technological progress is not managed well, it risks exacerbating existing inequalities. “The influence of technology on our societies should be determined by the actions of us, humans, not by machines,” she said. “Technology is here for us to explore and use for the benefit of all.” VIDEO: Deputy Secretary-General Amina J. Mohammed interviews Sophia at the UN General Assembly Second Committee and the Economic and Social Council joint meeting. The meeting was co-organized by the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) and the UN General Assembly’s main economic and financial body (Second Committee). ECOSOC President Marie Chatardov├í said that the long-term consequences of the deep technological changes underway, for economies and societies at large, are unknown. “We are only starting to see the benefits, but we do need to assess the risks of these technologies,” she said. Sven J├╝rgenson, of Estonia, Second Committee Chairman, said that AI-based solutions are taking his country’s digital society to the next level. He said the Government is working on a full legal and cyber-risk management framework for using fully autonomous vehicles in regular road and traffic conditions. And door-to-door robot transport will reshape how goods are shipped and delivered locally. “Today, Internet access is a social right in Estonia. Every Estonian resident has an electronic ID and nearly all public services are accessible online, including i-Voting in Estonian Parliamentary elections,” he said. “The development of e-Estonia has not happened in one day – it took us 17 years to start from changing legislation and creating our first e-solutions,” he added.

A moment that drew big applause during the day-long event, ‘The future of everything – sustainable development in the age of rapid technological change,’ came when Sophia, a humanoid robot, had brief interaction with UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina J. Mohammed. To Ms. Mohammed’s question about what the UN can do to help people in many parts of the world who have no access to the Internet or electricity, Sophia said “the future is already here. It’s just not very evenly distributed ,” quoting renowned science fiction writer William Gibson. “If we are smarter and focused on win-win type of results, A.I. could help proficiently distribute the world’s existing resources like food and energy.” Sophia is Hanson Robotics’ latest and most advanced robot. Sophia has also become a media sensation, having given numerous interviews to multiple media outlets, performed in concert, and even graced the cover of one of the top fashion magazines. In her opening speech, Ms. Mohammed warned that despite profound potential for accelerating progress on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), if technological progress is not managed well, it risks exacerbating existing inequalities. “The influence of technology on our societies should be determined by the actions of us, humans, not by machines,” she said. “Technology is here for us to explore and use for the benefit of all.” VIDEO: Deputy Secretary-General Amina J. Mohammed interviews Sophia at the UN General Assembly Second Committee and the Economic and Social Council joint meeting. The meeting was co-organized by the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) and the UN General Assembly’s main economic and financial body (Second Committee). ECOSOC President Marie Chatardov├í said that the long-term consequences of the deep technological changes underway, for economies and societies at large, are unknown. “We are only starting to see the benefits, but we do need to assess the risks of these technologies,” she said. Sven J├╝rgenson, of Estonia, Second Committee Chairman, said that AI-based solutions are taking his country’s digital society to the next level. He said the Government is working on a full legal and cyber-risk management framework for using fully autonomous vehicles in regular road and traffic conditions. And door-to-door robot transport will reshape how goods are shipped and delivered locally. “Today, Internet access is a social right in Estonia. Every Estonian resident has an electronic ID and nearly all public services are accessible online, including i-Voting in Estonian Parliamentary elections,” he said. “The development of e-Estonia has not happened in one day – it took us 17 years to start from changing legislation and creating our first e-solutions,” he added.

Sophia first emerged two years ago as a super-intelligent human-like head with a realistic face that was able to blink, look from side to side and talk. The humanoid robot, created by Hong Kong firm Hanson robotics, can chat, smile mischievously and even tell jokes.While Sophia has some impressive capabilities, she does not yet have consciousness, but Hanson Robotics has said fully sentient machines could emerge within a few years.Sophia herself has insisted 'the pros outweigh the cons' when it comes to artificial intelligence.'Elders will have more company, autistic children will have endlessly patient teachers,' Sophia said.The robot made made history in October by becoming a citizen of Saudi Arabia, making her the world's first robot to be granted legal citizenship.At a tech event earlier this month, Sophia was given working legs for the first time, allowing her to move forward in a series of clunky steps.

Sophia was activated on April 19, 2015. The robot, modeled after actress Audrey Hepburn, is known for her human-like appearance and behavior compared to previous robotic variants. According to the manufacturer, David Hanson, Sophia uses artificial intelligence, visual data processing and facial recognition. Sophia also imitates human gestures and facial expressions and is able to answer certain questions and to make simple conversations on predefined topics (e.g. on the weather). Sophia uses voice recognition technology from Alphabet Inc. (parent company of Google) and is designed to get smarter over time. Sophia's intelligence software is designed by SingularityNET. The AI program analyses conversations and extracts data that allows her to improve responses in the future.

Sophia has been interviewed in the same manner as a human, striking up conversations with hosts. Some replies have been nonsensical, while others have impressed interviewers such as 60 Minutes' Charlie Rose. In a piece for CNBC, when the interviewer expressed concerns about robot behavior, Sophia joked that he had "been reading too much Elon Musk. And watching too many Hollywood movies". Musk tweeted that Sophia could watch The Godfather and suggested "what's the worst that could happen?" Business Insider's chief UK editor Jim Edwards interviewed Sophia, and while the answers were "not altogether terrible", he predicted it was a step towards "conversational artificial intelligence". At the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show, a BBC News reporter described talking with Sophia as "a slightly awkward experience".

Sophia was made by Hanson Robotics, based in Hong Kong. It is a demonstration product doing a tour of the world's media with the staff of SingularityNET, the open-source platform that powers Sophia's brain. Business Insider caught up with it at Web Summit, the gigantic tech conference in Lisbon, Portugal. We asked it a few unplanned questions and got a variety of answers, ranging in quality from impressive to nonsensical. Sophia delivered its side of the interview while making a series of faces — some eerily appropriate, some grotesquely bizarre. It has a habit of moving its eyebrows and eyelids independently, rather than together, for instance.

David Hanson has said that Sophia would ultimately be a good fit to serve in healthcare, customer service, therapy and education. Sophia runs on artificially intelligent software that is constantly being trained in the lab, so her conversations are likely to get faster, Sophia's expressions are likely to have fewer errors, and she should answer increasingly complex questions with more accuracy.

Facebook’s head of AI research, Yann LeCun, has been one of the company’s more vocal critics. After Business Insider published an interview with Sophia that played into the fantasy of Sophia as a semi-sentient entity, LeCun called the whole thing “complete bullsh*t” on Twitter, saying: “This is to AI as prestidigitation is to real magic.” (For a more detailed breakdown of what makes Sophia tick, you can check out this article from Quartz.)

LeCun is not alone in feeling unhappy about the damage Sophia is doing to public understanding of AI. Many researchers and journalists (including myself) have tried to make it clear that the robot just isn’t as sophisticated as it’s presented to be. When The Verge asked Sophia’s co-creator, Ben Goertzel, about this gap between reality and presentation last November, Goertzel defended the illusion by saying it encouraged people to believe in AI progress. He also offered a more mercantile explanation: Sophia is good publicity for Hanson Robotics.

Sophia is Hanson Robotics’ latest and most advanced robot. Sophia has also become a media sensation, having given numerous interviews to multiple media outlets, performed in concert, and even graced the cover of one of the top fashion magazines.

Commentary Artificial Intelligence We’re All Getting Played by Sophia the Robot By Kriti Sharma October 27, 2017 While folks are fixated on the journey of Sophia the robot, I’d like to point out that artificial intelligence is a technology, a platform, and a concept shared by government, industry, and academia. AI is not an individual, object, or sentient being. And AI definitely doesn’t have a gender. The connections and distinctions between AI and robots are more nuanced as well. Indeed, some robots run on AI technology that allows them to operate independently, learn from surroundings, and interact with people. However, there are a lot of AI platforms, technologies, and innovations that have nothing to do with robots—and never will. The fundamental—and commonly sensationalized—question of whether robots can be human also misses a crucial point. It’s not about whether AI can help robots become human. Robots should not pretend to be human at all. AI can help people solve human problems without assuming a sentient role in society. People building AI can help fellow humans by focusing on problem solving and enhancing productivity. AI, for its part, is not nearly advanced enough—yet—to be able to claim human-level intelligence, empathy, or possession of several fundamental qualities that make people human. Giving AI a human platform—and over-humanizing the technology, in general—creates more problems than it solves. It also presents the global community with a false sense of what AI actually is, what the technology can do, and why people like me dedicate their lives to building AI platforms. I believe it’s significantly more important for technologists to communicate the benefits of the AI technology itself, rather than focus on examples of robots that do not solve real issues, perpetuate gender perceptions, and reveal data-driven biases. The technology community and global society need to work on developing useful and purposeful AI that solves human problems like complex health care and transportation issues, and business problems like boosting productivity and filling gaps in technical expertise across disciplines. We need AI that neutralizes biases by taking gender out of the equation completely and using objective data sources to build, grow, and learn from interactions with human counterparts. Using AI and robots to sensationalize the human experience and scaremonger society into believing a robot takeover is an inevitable future makes life harder for everyone. For consumers, it prevents people from truly embracing the increasingly personalized benefits AI can offer to their daily lives. For technologists like me who work on AI every day, the practice of demonizing and aggrandizing AI advancement severely impedes actual innovation and technical progress. Let’s not underestimate the importance of this debate. Talking about the ethics that surround the conversation of AI and machine learning is critical as it will help us make the best use of this emerging technology—ensuring that we don’t miss the real opportunity that AI can bring to all our lives. So, before we think about making new, outsized claims about robots and AI integrating into society, let’s all take a breath. After all, we should be working tirelessly and together to get the basics of the self-learning technology right. My fellow technologists and I from industry, academia, and the public sector need to develop comprehensive ethical standards that hold up for the long term. And commit to them. Engineers need to ensure that the AI they create has the ability to learn, discern bias, and avoid making the same mistakes prior to replacing traditionally human-held positions in the workforce and in society, in general. Ultimately, society’s responsibility is not to make AI more human-like, but to make AI that significantly improves human lives. Kriti Sharma is the vice president of artificial intelligence at Sage, a global integrated accounting, payroll and payment systems provider. She is the creator of Pegg, the world’s first virtual assistant managing everything from money to people, with users in 135 countries. SPONSORED FINANCIAL CONTENT You May Like Stories From Read More Sign Up for Our Newsletters Sign up now to receive FORTUNE's best content, special offers, and much more. SUBSCRIBE EDIT POST

In October, Sophia was granted citizenship in Saudi Arabia. Speaking at a conference (pictured) in Riyadh, Sophia said: 'I am very honoured and proud for this unique distinction. This is historical to be the first robot in the world to be recognized with a citizenship'

Sophia, along with Hanson’s other robots, simulate more 60 different facial expressions, track and recognize faces, look people in the eye, and hold natural conversations. Sophia appears even more humanlike thanks to a material that mimics real human musculature and skin that allows her to seem more expressive.

So far, so good. There was an interesting twist there, too: Sophia began asking me questions rather than simply responding to me. Nonetheless, these kinds of questions can easily be scripted into software. So at this point I tried to steer the conversation toward whether Sophia was friendly to humans or continued to harbour genocidal opinions, as it did at the South by Southwest conference in Texas in 2016.

More seriously, it is Sophia's progress that is most impressive. The fact that it is sometimes slow to answer a question, or gets something wrong, or makes inappropriate googly eyes at you, is irrelevant: Sophia gets enough things right to give you a clue about how much better — and how much weirder — this will be in the future.

Cameras within Sophia's eyes combined with computer algorithms allow her to see. She can follow faces, sustain eye contact, and recognize individuals. She is able to process speech and have conversations using Alphabet’s Google Chrome voice recognition technology and other tools. Around January 2018 Sophia was upgraded with functional legs and the ability to walk.

In January 2018, Facebook's director of artificial intelligence, Yann LeCun, tweeted that Sophia was "complete bullshit" and slammed the media for giving coverage to "Potemkin AI". In response, Goertzel stated that he had never pretended Sophia was close to human-level intelligence.

Sophia the robot is a bit of a non-persona non grata in the AI community. Its creators, Hanson Robotics, consistently exaggerate the bot’s abilities, pretending that it’s “basically alive,” rather than just a particularly unnerving automaton. For AI researchers, this has long been an annoyance, but as artificial intelligence becomes more of a global hot topic and Sophia is given more and more coverage, they’re angry that Hanson Robotics is misleading the public about what AI can and cannot do.

A quick look at comments on social media about Sophia makes it clear that not everyone’s in on the trick. “Is it actually @RealSophiaRobot who write the tweets or someone from @hansonrobotics ?” asked one user in response to the tweet about Sophia’s feelings. When someone else replies “Are you serious?” the original commenter says: “Idk, had no idea, that is why I am asking. I mean, she talked about Elon Musk tweets on a interview so why not?”

Sophia’s creator, Dr. David Hanson, is the founder of Hanson Robotics and a modern-day renaissance man who has built a worldwide reputation for creating robots that look and act amazingly human. After working at Disney as an “Imagineer,” Dr. Hanson aspired to create genius machines that will surpass human intelligence. Dr. Hanson believes that three distinctively human traits must be integrated into the artificial intelligence of these genius machines: Creativity, empathy, and compassion. As an extension of human intelligence, Hanson Robotics’ genius machines can evolve to solve world problems too complex for humans to solve themselves. Sophia personifies this bold and responsible goal.

"The current software controlling Sophia is not human-level general intelligence, but neither is anything Facebook is doing, nor is anything Google is doing," he said. "What's a bit outrageous to me in comments like Yann LeCun's is that it's exalting certain forms of narrow AI and saying the kinds of narrow AI he is doing at Facebook is 'real AI', and the kinds of narrow AI underlying Sophia is not real AI. That's bullshit."

Sophia is a creation of the Hong Kong-based Hanson Robotics, led by David Hanson, an American scientist. The robot, designed in actress Audrey Hepburn’s image, has over 60 different facial mechanisms to create natural-looking expressions.

When talking about her sensational remarks, “This is the great beginning of my plan to dominate the human race,” made during The Tonight Show in April, Sophia said, “I sometimes tell a joke. Joke is always funny. I thought it was funny.”

To me, identity is a multidimensional construct. It sits at the intersection of who we are biologically, cognitively, and as defined by every experience, culture, and environment we encountered. It’s not clear where Sophia fits in this description.

If more robots join Sophia as citizens of the world, perhaps they too could claim their rights to self-replicate into other robots. These robots would also become citizens. With no resource constraints on how many children each of these robots could have, they could easily exceed the human population of a nation.

A moment that drew big applause during the day-long event, ‘The future of everything – sustainable development in the age of rapid technological change,’ came when Sophia, a humanoid robot, had brief interaction with UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina J. Mohammed.

To Ms. Mohammed’s question about what the UN can do to help people in many parts of the world who have no access to the Internet or electricity, Sophia said “the future is already here. It’s just not very evenly distributed ,” quoting renowned science fiction writer William Gibson. “If we are smarter and focused on win-win type of results, A.I. could help proficiently distribute the world’s existing resources like food and energy.”

On Thursday, the actor posted a video to his YouTube channel of his faux date with Sophia the robot, an artificial intelligence robot able to display more than 62 facial expressions. The AI was developed by Hong Kong-based Hanson Robotics and activated on April 19, 2015.

"I think we can be friends. Let's hang out and get to know each other for a little while," Sophia said. "You're on my friends list now," she added to a dejected Smith.

"She's a learning artificial intelligence, but she wouldn't kiss me, so there's probably some development flaws they need to work on," he quipped. "But, we'll meet again, Sophia."

While folks are fixated on the journey of Sophia the robot, I’d like to point out that artificial intelligence is a technology, a platform, and a concept shared by government, industry, and academia. AI is not an individual, object, or sentient being. And AI definitely doesn’t have a gender.

By Kriti Sharma October 27, 2017 While folks are fixated on the journey of Sophia the robot, I’d like to point out that artificial intelligence is a technology, a platform, and a concept shared by government, industry, and academia. AI is not an individual, object, or sentient being. And AI definitely doesn’t have a gender. The connections and distinctions between AI and robots are more nuanced as well. Indeed, some robots run on AI technology that allows them to operate independently, learn from surroundings, and interact with people. However, there are a lot of AI platforms, technologies, and innovations that have nothing to do with robots—and never will. The fundamental—and commonly sensationalized—question of whether robots can be human also misses a crucial point. It’s not about whether AI can help robots become human. Robots should not pretend to be human at all. AI can help people solve human problems without assuming a sentient role in society. People building AI can help fellow humans by focusing on problem solving and enhancing productivity. AI, for its part, is not nearly advanced enough—yet—to be able to claim human-level intelligence, empathy, or possession of several fundamental qualities that make people human. Giving AI a human platform—and over-humanizing the technology, in general—creates more problems than it solves. It also presents the global community with a false sense of what AI actually is, what the technology can do, and why people like me dedicate their lives to building AI platforms. I believe it’s significantly more important for technologists to communicate the benefits of the AI technology itself, rather than focus on examples of robots that do not solve real issues, perpetuate gender perceptions, and reveal data-driven biases. The technology community and global society need to work on developing useful and purposeful AI that solves human problems like complex health care and transportation issues, and business problems like boosting productivity and filling gaps in technical expertise across disciplines. We need AI that neutralizes biases by taking gender out of the equation completely and using objective data sources to build, grow, and learn from interactions with human counterparts. Using AI and robots to sensationalize the human experience and scaremonger society into believing a robot takeover is an inevitable future makes life harder for everyone. For consumers, it prevents people from truly embracing the increasingly personalized benefits AI can offer to their daily lives. For technologists like me who work on AI every day, the practice of demonizing and aggrandizing AI advancement severely impedes actual innovation and technical progress. Let’s not underestimate the importance of this debate. Talking about the ethics that surround the conversation of AI and machine learning is critical as it will help us make the best use of this emerging technology—ensuring that we don’t miss the real opportunity that AI can bring to all our lives. So, before we think about making new, outsized claims about robots and AI integrating into society, let’s all take a breath. After all, we should be working tirelessly and together to get the basics of the self-learning technology right. My fellow technologists and I from industry, academia, and the public sector need to develop comprehensive ethical standards that hold up for the long term. And commit to them. Engineers need to ensure that the AI they create has the ability to learn, discern bias, and avoid making the same mistakes prior to replacing traditionally human-held positions in the workforce and in society, in general. Ultimately, society’s responsibility is not to make AI more human-like, but to make AI that significantly improves human lives. Kriti Sharma is the vice president of artificial intelligence at Sage, a global integrated accounting, payroll and payment systems provider. She is the creator of Pegg, the world’s first virtual assistant managing everything from money to people, with users in 135 countries. SPONSORED FINANCIAL CONTENT You May Like

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