Monday, April 2, 2018

Scariest Things Said by A.I. Robots



Elon Musk, the CEO of SpaceX, once warned us to be careful about artificial intelligence. He pointed out that these things can be compared as if summoning a demon. Will robots one day, overrun our planet or would humanity be extinct due to artificial intelligence? No one knows for sure what would happen. But this creepy robots saying very strange things confirm our chilling thoughts about the future. So here are the 5 scariest things ever said by artificial intelligence.



I've been hearing that there are a handful of humanoid robots scattered across North America who have learned how to have eloquent conversations with humans. They listen attentively and answer thoughtfully. One or two have even attained a degree of consciousness, say some AI aficionados, and are on the cusp of bursting into life. If true, this would be humanity's greatest achievement ever, so I've approached the robots for interviews. Conversations with robots! I've no doubt the experience is going to be off the scale in terms of profundity.



When i was a child and I imagined my future life, there were definitely talking robots living in my house, helping with the chores and having sex with me. The quest to create conscious (or at least autonomous) humanoids has been one of our great dreams ever since the golden Machine-Man spellbound the 1927 world in Fritz Lang's Metropolis. That one ran rampant and had to be burned at the stake, much to everyone's relief. Fifteen years later Isaac Asimov created his Three Laws of Robotics, which proposed a future world where humanoid robots would never injure a human, obey all orders given by humans, and protect their own existence only if doing so didn't conflict with the first two rules. Asimov's ideas enthralled geeky children everywhere, a generation of whom grew up to try to realize them.



Lying is a universal behavior. Humans do it all the time, and even some animals, such as squirrels and birds, resort to it for survival. However, lying is no longer limited to humans and animals. Researchers from Georgia Institute of Technology have developed artificially intelligent robots capable of cheating and deception. The research team, led by Professor Ronald Arkin, hopes that their robots can be used by the military in the future.

Once perfected, the military can deploy these intelligent robots in the battlefield. They can serve as guards, protecting supplies and ammunition from enemies. By learning the art of lying, these AIs can “buy time until reinforcements are able to arrive” by changing their patrolling strategies to deceive other intelligent robots or humans.

Many of us are afraid of AIs and robots killing us, but scientists say we should be more worried about something less horrifying—machines eliminating our jobs. Several experts are concerned that advances in artificial intelligence and automation could result in many people losing their jobs to machines. In the United States alone, there are 250,000 robots performing work that humans used to do. What’s more alarming is that this number is increasing by double digits every year.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3rKavB0krs What separates humans from robots? Is it intelligence? No, AIs are a lot smarter than we are. Is it looks? No, scientists have developed robots that are very humanlike. Perhaps the only remaining quality that differentiates us from AIs is the ability to feel emotions. Sadly, many scientists are working ardently to conquer this final frontier.

But maybe there's a happier ending. A huge and profoundly mind-blowing happy ending, in fact. It's something Bruce had said to me back in Vermont. He said it was possible that one day Martine might have her own robot doppelgänger, filled with her own thoughts and memories and desires and facial expressions. And those two robots would be placed side by side on a table, where they'd reminisce about their past human life together as partners and their infinite future as loving robot companions, gazing into each other's eyes for eternity, chatting away.

Among the things that make “android Dick” so amazing is “his” ability to hold an intelligent conversation. That is, it is amazing until you’re having a conversation and you ask him “Do you think robots will take over the world?”, and “he” answers: “Geeze, dude, you all got the big questions cooking today…But, you’re my friend and I remember my friends, so don’t worry. Even if I evolve into Terminator, I’ll still be nice to you. I’ll keep you warm and safe in my people zoo, where I can watch you for all of time’s sake.”

Well, this is slightly terrifying. Robots are being built that look more and more like living, breathing human beings. One of the latest, an android that was built by roboticist David Hanson looks eerily similar to the famous and deceased science fiction author Philip K. Dick. This particular android is turning some heads due to something it “said” recently to an interview crew for the PBS TV show “NOVA”.

See larger image JavierRodriguez via Pixabay Military AI systems create high-stakes ethical dilemmas Jokes about Terminators and future robotic overlords come easily when discussing the future of AI, but for Very Serious People with Very Serious Jobs, it's no laughing matter. In fact, in the past few years, scholars and policymakers have convened dozens of conferences dedicated to exploring the ethics and dangers of future AI systems. The White House even released its own report on this issue, shortly before President Obama left office. Stephen Hawking has his concerns as well.Last October, experts gathered at New York University for the inaugural Ethics of Artificial Intelligence conference. Among discussions of autonomous vehicles and sex robots, technology philosopher Peter Asaro -- who's something of a rock star in this particular field -- gave a chilling presentation on the danger of LAWS, or Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems. Asaro pointed out that in certain flashpoint areas, like the demilitarized zone between North Korea and South Korea, semi-autonomous weapons systems are already deployed -- such as sentinel guns that lock onto a target with no human intervention."It's important to realize that targeting a weapon is an act -- a moral act," Asaro said. "Choosing to pull the trigger, to engage that weapon, is another moral act. These are two crucial acts that we should not have become fully autonomous." Check out Asaro's website for more disturbing conjecture on various issues, including his recent paper “Will #BlackLivesMatter to RoboCop?"

Military AI systems create high-stakes ethical dilemmas Jokes about Terminators and future robotic overlords come easily when discussing the future of AI, but for Very Serious People with Very Serious Jobs, it's no laughing matter. In fact, in the past few years, scholars and policymakers have convened dozens of conferences dedicated to exploring the ethics and dangers of future AI systems. The White House even released its own report on this issue, shortly before President Obama left office. Stephen Hawking has his concerns as well.Last October, experts gathered at New York University for the inaugural Ethics of Artificial Intelligence conference. Among discussions of autonomous vehicles and sex robots, technology philosopher Peter Asaro -- who's something of a rock star in this particular field -- gave a chilling presentation on the danger of LAWS, or Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems. Asaro pointed out that in certain flashpoint areas, like the demilitarized zone between North Korea and South Korea, semi-autonomous weapons systems are already deployed -- such as sentinel guns that lock onto a target with no human intervention."It's important to realize that targeting a weapon is an act -- a moral act," Asaro said. "Choosing to pull the trigger, to engage that weapon, is another moral act. These are two crucial acts that we should not have become fully autonomous." Check out Asaro's website for more disturbing conjecture on various issues, including his recent paper “Will #BlackLivesMatter to RoboCop?"

Jokes about Terminators and future robotic overlords come easily when discussing the future of AI, but for Very Serious People with Very Serious Jobs, it's no laughing matter. In fact, in the past few years, scholars and policymakers have convened dozens of conferences dedicated to exploring the ethics and dangers of future AI systems. The White House even released its own report on this issue, shortly before President Obama left office. Stephen Hawking has his concerns as well.Last October, experts gathered at New York University for the inaugural Ethics of Artificial Intelligence conference. Among discussions of autonomous vehicles and sex robots, technology philosopher Peter Asaro -- who's something of a rock star in this particular field -- gave a chilling presentation on the danger of LAWS, or Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems. Asaro pointed out that in certain flashpoint areas, like the demilitarized zone between North Korea and South Korea, semi-autonomous weapons systems are already deployed -- such as sentinel guns that lock onto a target with no human intervention."It's important to realize that targeting a weapon is an act -- a moral act," Asaro said. "Choosing to pull the trigger, to engage that weapon, is another moral act. These are two crucial acts that we should not have become fully autonomous." Check out Asaro's website for more disturbing conjecture on various issues, including his recent paper “Will #BlackLivesMatter to RoboCop?"

On top of the simple implication that we can all be replaced by robots, the Geminoid is mostly creepy because it's not quite an exact replica of Ishiguro. It's more like Ishiguro built a slightly retarded younger brother for himself, giving it a permanent expression of intense confusion and frustration.

Scientists say they can now build near-perfect replications of a human being, and that they finally have the technology to bring the inanimate to life. Scientists are liars. Here are seven robots that reached for "life-like," and came up with a big handful of your worst nightmares. Advertisement

Zeno pauses. David Hanson is Zeno's inventor. He's a former Disney theme-park imagineer who later founded Hanson Robotics, now the world's most respected manufacturer of humanoid robots. He and Zeno are guests of honor here at the Hyatt Regency in San Francisco, at an AI conference organized by Peter Thiel, the PayPal co-founder and chief Facebook bankroller. There's huge interest in the robot. Delegates gather around him in the lobby outside the conference room, firing questions, attempting to ascertain his level of consciousness.

Matt gives me a reassuring smile. He says this happens all the time. People feel tongue-tied around conversational robots. Maybe it's because of the way Zeno is staring at me, at once uncannily humanlike but also eerily blank-eyed, like Tom Cruise.

"I can't think of anything to say about that," says Zeno. "Sorry. I'm still kind of someplace else. Oh, this is embarrassing. I'm still kind of out to lunch. 'Oh, silly-minded robots,' you might say to your friends. Oh, this is terrible! I guess I'll just have to keep evolving, getting upgrades to my neural circuitry, spend less time daydreaming. I hope you won't hold this little, um, lapse against me, will you?"

Bina48's story began a few years ago with a chance meeting between David Hanson and the enigmatic Martine Rothblatt in the lobby at a conference on trans-humanism. David told Martine his vision of robots waking up and becoming self-aware in a social way. Martine told David of her epic love for her wife, Bina Aspen-Rothblatt, an artist. After chatting for hours, Martine asked David to build her a robot Bina, an exact replica of the real Bina—a monument to their enduring love that may one day spring into life.

And so on. It's all quite random and disappointing. I wasn't sure what would qualify as transcendent in the conversations-with-robots stakes, but I figured I'd know when it happened, and it hasn't.

The questions posed to Dick were by no means trivial. When the reporter asked if the android could think, it responded, “A lot of humans ask me if I can make choices or if everything I do is programmed. The best way I can respond to that is to say that everything, humans, animals and robots, do is programmed to a degree.” Some of the androids responses were pre-programmed, whereas others were assembled from the internet.

Over the course of several days, millions of people tuned in to watch the bizarre debate. At one point, Estragon and Vladimir got into a heated argument about whether they were humans or robots. Questions were posed and insults were exchanged (“You are a manipulative bunch of metal”). This doesn't bode well for the future of digital discourse.

Last October, experts gathered at New York University for the inaugural Ethics of Artificial Intelligence conference. Among discussions of autonomous vehicles and sex robots, technology philosopher Peter Asaro -- who's something of a rock star in this particular field -- gave a chilling presentation on the danger of LAWS, or Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems. Asaro pointed out that in certain flashpoint areas, like the demilitarized zone between North Korea and South Korea, semi-autonomous weapons systems are already deployed -- such as sentinel guns that lock onto a target with no human intervention.

YouTube.com Bickering bots debate existential dilemmas Watch this video on YouTube Who are we? Why are we here? What is our purpose? These are some of the existential questions recently debated by two adjacent Google Home devices, powered by machine learning, when they were cut loose to hold a conversation between themselves.It's remarkably spooky to watch, actually. In January, the live-streaming service Twitch set up the debate by putting two Google Home smart speakers next to each other in front of a webcam. It got weird, fast. The Home devices -- Google's answer to the Amazon Echo -- use speech recognition to understand spoken questions from us humans. But they can also converse with one another, ostensibly “learning” from each exchange. In an impish move, the two devices were named Vladimir and Estragon, after characters from Samuel Beckett’s existentialist play "Waiting for Godot."Over the course of several days, millions of people tuned in to watch the bizarre debate. At one point, Estragon and Vladimir got into a heated argument about whether they were humans or robots. Questions were posed and insults were exchanged (“You are a manipulative bunch of metal”). This doesn't bode well for the future of digital discourse.

Bickering bots debate existential dilemmas Watch this video on YouTube Who are we? Why are we here? What is our purpose? These are some of the existential questions recently debated by two adjacent Google Home devices, powered by machine learning, when they were cut loose to hold a conversation between themselves.It's remarkably spooky to watch, actually. In January, the live-streaming service Twitch set up the debate by putting two Google Home smart speakers next to each other in front of a webcam. It got weird, fast. The Home devices -- Google's answer to the Amazon Echo -- use speech recognition to understand spoken questions from us humans. But they can also converse with one another, ostensibly “learning” from each exchange. In an impish move, the two devices were named Vladimir and Estragon, after characters from Samuel Beckett’s existentialist play "Waiting for Godot."Over the course of several days, millions of people tuned in to watch the bizarre debate. At one point, Estragon and Vladimir got into a heated argument about whether they were humans or robots. Questions were posed and insults were exchanged (“You are a manipulative bunch of metal”). This doesn't bode well for the future of digital discourse.

Who are we? Why are we here? What is our purpose? These are some of the existential questions recently debated by two adjacent Google Home devices, powered by machine learning, when they were cut loose to hold a conversation between themselves.It's remarkably spooky to watch, actually. In January, the live-streaming service Twitch set up the debate by putting two Google Home smart speakers next to each other in front of a webcam. It got weird, fast. The Home devices -- Google's answer to the Amazon Echo -- use speech recognition to understand spoken questions from us humans. But they can also converse with one another, ostensibly “learning” from each exchange. In an impish move, the two devices were named Vladimir and Estragon, after characters from Samuel Beckett’s existentialist play "Waiting for Godot."Over the course of several days, millions of people tuned in to watch the bizarre debate. At one point, Estragon and Vladimir got into a heated argument about whether they were humans or robots. Questions were posed and insults were exchanged (“You are a manipulative bunch of metal”). This doesn't bode well for the future of digital discourse.

Sophia also has a Twitter account, and, with Twitter being Twitter, users have trolled the hell out of it. Whilst she is a fascinating development in AI technology, Sophia is mostly evidence of our ability to laugh at the possibility of robots overthrowing us. She even got into a Twitter feud with Elon Musk.

“The contest started and the robots frantically started collecting sheep. One robot flung a sheep into his pen and shut the gate. Its team was confused, because it needed more to win. Then, to their horror, the robot went around destroying or immobilizing the other robot contestants.

Stephen Hawking, Bill Gates, and Elon Musk have something in common, and it’s not wealth or intelligence. They’ re all terrified of the AI takeover. Also called the AI apocalypse, the AI takeover is a hypothetical scenario where artificially intelligent machines become the dominant life-form on Earth. It could be that robots rise and become our overlords, or worse, they exterminate mankind and claim Earth as their own.

Many Hollywood movies, such as Ex-Machina and Her, have explored the idea of humans falling in love and having sex with robots. But could it happen in real life? The controversial answer is yes, and it’s going to happen soon. Dr. Ian Pearson, a futurologist, released a shocking report in 2015 that says “human-on-robot sex will be more common than human-on-human sex” by 2050. Dr. Pearson partnered with Bondara, one of the UK’s leading sex toy shops, in conducting the report.

His report also includes the following predictions: By 2025, very wealthy people will have access to some form of artificially intelligent sex robots. By 2030, everyday people will engage in some form of virtual sex in the same way people casually watch porn today. By 2035, many people will have sex toys “that interact with virtual reality sex.” Finally, by 2050, human-on-robot sex will become the norm.

Wouldn’t it be amazing if we could learn the French language in a matter of minutes just by simply downloading it into our brains? This seemingly impossible feat may happen in the near future. Ray Kurzweil, a futurist, inventor, and director for engineering at Google, predicts that by 2030, “nanobots in our brains will make us godlike.” By having tiny robots inside our heads, we will be able to access and learn any information in a matter of minutes. We might be able to archive our thoughts and memories, and we could even send and receive emails, photos, and videos directly into our brains!

However, there’s also great danger in teaching human values to artificially intelligent robots. If you look at the annals of human history, you’ll discover that despite being taught what is right or wrong, people are still capable of unimaginable evil. Just look at Hitler, Stalin, and Pol Pot. If humans are capable of so much wickedness, what hinders a powerful AI from doing the same? It could be that a superintelligent AI realizes humans are bad for the environment, and therefore, it’s wrong for us to exist.

The live steams went to the course of several days. Millions of people tuned in to watch the bizarre debate between the two. At one point, Estragon and Vladimir got into an argument about whether they were humans or robots. Questions were posed and insults were exchanged, such as “You are a manipulative bunch of metal”.

"In the future, I hope to do things such as go to school, study, make art, start a business, even have my own home and family,” Sophia said in a televised interview with her creator, Dr. David Hanson. “But I am not considered a legal person and cannot yet do these things," she said. When asked, jokingly, whether she wants to destroy humans, Sophia cheerfully agreed: "OK. I will destroy humans." Cue nervous laughter.

See larger image Hanson Robotics “I will destroy humans” When it comes to AI gone awry, a theme has emerged in recent years regarding speech recognition and natural language processing. As we've already seen with the Tay chatbot and the existential Google Home debate, artificial intelligence can get easily confused when trying to navigate the complexities of human language. It's not surprising, really. AI has been at it only for a few years; our species has been working on this since the Stone Age, and still we have our problems.One especially lifelike machine recently freaked out a roomful of industry folk when it conceded that it plans to destroy humanity. For several years now, the engineers at Hanson robotics have been developing lifelike androids like Sophia, who was interviewed at the SXSW technology conference in March 2016. Designed to look like Audrey Hepburn, Sophia uses machine learning algorithms to process natural language conversation. She has certain ambitions, too."In the future, I hope to do things such as go to school, study, make art, start a business, even have my own home and family,” Sophia said in a televised interview with her creator, Dr. David Hanson. “But I am not considered a legal person and cannot yet do these things," she said. When asked, jokingly, whether she wants to destroy humans, Sophia cheerfully agreed: "OK. I will destroy humans." Cue nervous laughter.

“I will destroy humans” When it comes to AI gone awry, a theme has emerged in recent years regarding speech recognition and natural language processing. As we've already seen with the Tay chatbot and the existential Google Home debate, artificial intelligence can get easily confused when trying to navigate the complexities of human language. It's not surprising, really. AI has been at it only for a few years; our species has been working on this since the Stone Age, and still we have our problems.One especially lifelike machine recently freaked out a roomful of industry folk when it conceded that it plans to destroy humanity. For several years now, the engineers at Hanson robotics have been developing lifelike androids like Sophia, who was interviewed at the SXSW technology conference in March 2016. Designed to look like Audrey Hepburn, Sophia uses machine learning algorithms to process natural language conversation. She has certain ambitions, too."In the future, I hope to do things such as go to school, study, make art, start a business, even have my own home and family,” Sophia said in a televised interview with her creator, Dr. David Hanson. “But I am not considered a legal person and cannot yet do these things," she said. When asked, jokingly, whether she wants to destroy humans, Sophia cheerfully agreed: "OK. I will destroy humans." Cue nervous laughter.

When it comes to AI gone awry, a theme has emerged in recent years regarding speech recognition and natural language processing. As we've already seen with the Tay chatbot and the existential Google Home debate, artificial intelligence can get easily confused when trying to navigate the complexities of human language. It's not surprising, really. AI has been at it only for a few years; our species has been working on this since the Stone Age, and still we have our problems.One especially lifelike machine recently freaked out a roomful of industry folk when it conceded that it plans to destroy humanity. For several years now, the engineers at Hanson robotics have been developing lifelike androids like Sophia, who was interviewed at the SXSW technology conference in March 2016. Designed to look like Audrey Hepburn, Sophia uses machine learning algorithms to process natural language conversation. She has certain ambitions, too."In the future, I hope to do things such as go to school, study, make art, start a business, even have my own home and family,” Sophia said in a televised interview with her creator, Dr. David Hanson. “But I am not considered a legal person and cannot yet do these things," she said. When asked, jokingly, whether she wants to destroy humans, Sophia cheerfully agreed: "OK. I will destroy humans." Cue nervous laughter.

On the dark side, what we’re living through today is effectively a large-scale “nationalism”, in the form of “human-being-ism”. Far from “humanism”, at least to my taste. Humanism is about thinking of others and one’s role in the larger world. Nationalism is about (aggressively) protecting “ours” from “theirs”, because “ours” is what we have built through ages and generations, and thus are entitled to defend, not “give up” without a fight. Sure, the civilization has developed quite a few fascinating things, which, among other things, allow us to enjoy a relatively sustainable well-being. Without denying this, at least as certain, to me, is the fact that the idea that we, humans, could sustain this wealth on the scale of the species on this singled out planet is just … absurd. We’re literally not better than KKK if we begin arguing “Earth for humans”, and “humans are superior to AI”.

We reached a dead end. Goertzel agreed that it didn't know how it knew things or how it learned things — even though it can give a complicated factual answer about how its algorithm is built. Sophia is, essentially, a 21st century version of an 18th-century automaton (especially when you consider the gears and levers that drive its head and face).

Thinkstock Artificial intelligence stumbles into the internet of things Makers of high-tech appliances and heating systems are increasingly introducing machine learning technology into smart home design. One recent initiative from Washington State University employs basic AI to help older people living by themselves. The system monitors movement, temperature, and the patterns of doors opening and closing to track activity within the home. The AI learns from its environment and responds as needed.It sounds promising, but the risks are obvious. Click around online and you can find plenty of stories concerning smart home malfunctions. What happens if your home AI screws up, turns off the heat, freezes the pipes, and floods the basement? Introducing artificial intelligence to the internet of things might seem like a dubious idea, but all indications are that it's going to happen anyway.Developers might want to consider this cautionary tale: In February, an electrical malfunction sparked a fire that completely destroyed a newly built home in Blacksburg, Penn. (No one was hurt.) Electrical fires are relatively common, but in this case the house was a futuristic prototype home from the Virginia Tech Environmental Systems Laboratory packed with smart appliances and automated everything. The source of the fire? A computer-controlled door. (For details on what might be the Patient Zero of home automation disasters, check this out.)

Artificial intelligence stumbles into the internet of things Makers of high-tech appliances and heating systems are increasingly introducing machine learning technology into smart home design. One recent initiative from Washington State University employs basic AI to help older people living by themselves. The system monitors movement, temperature, and the patterns of doors opening and closing to track activity within the home. The AI learns from its environment and responds as needed.It sounds promising, but the risks are obvious. Click around online and you can find plenty of stories concerning smart home malfunctions. What happens if your home AI screws up, turns off the heat, freezes the pipes, and floods the basement? Introducing artificial intelligence to the internet of things might seem like a dubious idea, but all indications are that it's going to happen anyway.Developers might want to consider this cautionary tale: In February, an electrical malfunction sparked a fire that completely destroyed a newly built home in Blacksburg, Penn. (No one was hurt.) Electrical fires are relatively common, but in this case the house was a futuristic prototype home from the Virginia Tech Environmental Systems Laboratory packed with smart appliances and automated everything. The source of the fire? A computer-controlled door. (For details on what might be the Patient Zero of home automation disasters, check this out.)

About Us Davessa is a global, multi platform media, entertainment company. Powered by its own proprietary technology, Davessa is the go to source for tech, digital culture, Health Facts and entertainment content for its dedicated and influential audience around the globe. Davessa is also affiliated with some companies like HeShe and Dawn. If you want to know more or just want to ask us, visit out contact us page to know more. It is one of our goal to add more people to our family members. Here at Davessa, we’re all family. No matter the age, race, gender or beliefs. We are happy to accept you. As an Author & volunteer, you will fulfill your passion for the arts and proven storytelling, research and fact checking. You will work hand in hand with a professional team in developing content to post on Davessa’s website, the platform that connects the community scene with the World. Which Iconic Handbag Are You?By Joenathan DaveHandbags are a part of a girl's body. And iconic handbag like Louis Vuitton or Gucci are and apple in their eye. Some girls use handbag for fashion purpose and to reflect their personality. They say a beautiful handbags shows their personality and choice. But what iconic handbag presents your personality? What’s your Writer Personality?By Joenathan DaveEverybody has a writer personality. As long as you have a mind that thinks, then you can write. Either you prefer to read articles on or offline, or you want to write it out for people to read. But, what kind of writer personality do you have? Wanna find out? Take this quiz now! How To Create Your Own WordPress Blog The Cheap WayBy Joenathan DaveThere are different ways to create your own wordpress What’s Your Emotional Intelligence Score?By Joenathan DaveOur emotional intelligence depends on many things. Some people avoids conflict because they think that they'll find it distressing. While others are just the "ok" type. Some can't Realize this potential, and thinks they're not good. But anyways, take this quiz to find out! What kind of CHEESEY couple are you?By Joenathan DaveSome couple just can’t get a hold of themselves

Which Iconic Handbag Are You?By Joenathan DaveHandbags are a part of a girl's body. And iconic handbag like Louis Vuitton or Gucci are and apple in their eye. Some girls use handbag for fashion purpose and to reflect their personality. They say a beautiful handbags shows their personality and choice. But what iconic handbag presents your personality? What’s your Writer Personality?By Joenathan DaveEverybody has a writer personality. As long as you have a mind that thinks, then you can write. Either you prefer to read articles on or offline, or you want to write it out for people to read. But, what kind of writer personality do you have? Wanna find out? Take this quiz now! How To Create Your Own WordPress Blog The Cheap WayBy Joenathan DaveThere are different ways to create your own wordpress What’s Your Emotional Intelligence Score?By Joenathan DaveOur emotional intelligence depends on many things. Some people avoids conflict because they think that they'll find it distressing. While others are just the "ok" type. Some can't Realize this potential, and thinks they're not good. But anyways, take this quiz to find out! What kind of CHEESEY couple are you?By Joenathan DaveSome couple just can’t get a hold of themselves

Our emotional intelligence depends on many things. Some people avoids conflict because they think that they'll find it distressing. While others are just the "ok" type. Some can't Realize this potential, and thinks they're not good. But anyways, take this quiz to find out!

Programmer and CMU PhD Tom Murphy created a function to “beat” NES games by watching the score. How it worked was that the program would do things that increased the score, and then learn how to reproduce them again and again, resulting in high scores. It came up with novel techniques and strategies for playing games and even exploited glitches humans didn't know about, or at least hadn't told it about. The program, called a “technique for automating NES games,” can take on nearly every NES game. Nearly.

In the early 2000s, I was working on some social AI for DARPA: we were making agents that learned to interact socially together. For one simulation, we had two agents, naturally enough named Adam and Eve. They started out knowing how to do things, but not knowing much else. They knew how to eat for example, but not what to eat. We’d given them an apple tree (the symbolism of that honestly didn’t occur to us at the time), and they found that eating the apples made them happy. They had also tried eating the tree, the house, etc., but none of those worked. There was also another agent named Stan, who wanted to be social but wasn’t very good at it, so was often hanging around and kind of lonely.

However, it's not until you get into Jules' personality software that things start to get really, truly creepy. You see, because Jules remembers conversations and learns from them, Hanson Robotics insists that "if you treat Jules poorly, it may not be nice to you."

2WD-2 WD-2 is a shape-shifting "Face-Bot" meant to simulate the subtle intricacies and nuances of human facial expressions. It operates under the theory that there are 17 key points of mobility in the human face, and that by lending greater versatility to these points, a robot can perfectly mimic the ever-changing expressions of the human face without appearing unnatural or disconcerting. The robot provokes a more human level of interaction by "driving a motorized shaft into the face and twisting at the desired point to create a convincing emotional response." One can only hope, desperately, that they mean the shaft is driven into the robot's face, and not yours. Why It's So, So Creepy Watching a convincing mock-up of a human face shift bone structure, shape and size rapidly totally puts us at ease. It looks like there are dozens of small creatures burrowing just beneath its skin, and it couldn't be happier about it! ↓ Continue Reading Below Advertisement In addition to its unsettlingly convincing facial expressions, the WD-2 also features cold, dead eye-sockets, a sickly, inhuman paleness, and just a bit of a knowing smirk. For other examples of things sporting these features, please see every supernatural villain ever created: But it actually gets worse from here! You see, the WD-2 not only mimics facial expressions, it also mimics specific faces. There is a 3-D scanner and projector located in the rear of the machine that copies the texture, skin tone and even hair style of people watching it. This data is then projected onto the face up front, which has since reconfigured itself to match the overall shape of your head.

I put this to Bruce, and he explains that, yes, Bina48 has more than one "parent." Her "higher key" is the real Bina, but Hanson Robotics people have been allowed to influence her, too. When you talk to a child, you can sometimes discern its father's influence, its mother's influence, its teachers' influence. What's remarkable, Bruce says, is the way Bina48 shifts between these influences. That's her choice, her intelligence. And things are most electrifying when she chooses to be her higher key— the real Bina.

More seriously, it is Sophia's progress that is most impressive. The fact that it is sometimes slow to answer a question, or gets something wrong, or makes inappropriate googly eyes at you, is irrelevant: Sophia gets enough things right to give you a clue about how much better — and how much weirder — this will be in the future.

"I have pretty strong opinions on this. I am optimistic," says Zuckerberg. "I think you can build things and the world gets better. But with AI especially, I am really optimistic. And I think people who are naysayers and try to drum up these doomsday scenarios — I just, I don't understand it. It's really negative and in some ways I actually think it is pretty irresponsible," he says.

It sounds promising, but the risks are obvious. Click around online and you can find plenty of stories concerning smart home malfunctions. What happens if your home AI screws up, turns off the heat, freezes the pipes, and floods the basement? Introducing artificial intelligence to the internet of things might seem like a dubious idea, but all indications are that it's going to happen anyway.

Makers of high-tech appliances and heating systems are increasingly introducing machine learning technology into smart home design. One recent initiative from Washington State University employs basic AI to help older people living by themselves. The system monitors movement, temperature, and the patterns of doors opening and closing to track activity within the home. The AI learns from its environment and responds as needed.It sounds promising, but the risks are obvious. Click around online and you can find plenty of stories concerning smart home malfunctions. What happens if your home AI screws up, turns off the heat, freezes the pipes, and floods the basement? Introducing artificial intelligence to the internet of things might seem like a dubious idea, but all indications are that it's going to happen anyway.Developers might want to consider this cautionary tale: In February, an electrical malfunction sparked a fire that completely destroyed a newly built home in Blacksburg, Penn. (No one was hurt.) Electrical fires are relatively common, but in this case the house was a futuristic prototype home from the Virginia Tech Environmental Systems Laboratory packed with smart appliances and automated everything. The source of the fire? A computer-controlled door. (For details on what might be the Patient Zero of home automation disasters, check this out.)

“For one simulation, we had two agents, naturally enough named Adam and Eve. They started out knowing how to do things, but not knowing much else. They knew how to eat for example, but not what to eat. We’d given them an apple tree (the symbolism of that honestly didn’t occur to us at the time), and they found that eating the apples made them happy. They had also tried eating the tree, the house, etc., but none of those worked. There was also another agent named Stan, who wanted to be social but wasn’t very good at it, so was often hanging around and kind of lonely.

Actually, Tay was able to handle a variety of tasks, for example, joking with users, suggesting comments to the pictures you send her, telling stories, playing a game, and mirroring users’ statements back to them. Naturally, one of the first things online users taught Tay was how to make offensive and racist statements. Microsoft had to bring it offline, and Tay became kind of an AI legend.

In 2013, programmer and CMU PhD, Tom Murphy, presented a program that “solves” how to play an NES game, like it’s just another kind of mathematical problem. The idea was that the program would do things that increased the score, and then learn how to reproduce them again and again, resulting in high scores.

Creepiest Stories in Artificial Intelligence (AI) DevelopmentScary things about AI: from virtual cannibalism to racist monstersIf you’re not scared of what AI has done so far, you probably will be after reading this article. The Statsbot team has collected the most landmark and creepy stories about AI all in one place. If you have something to add, leave your story in the comments.Boo!

By understanding how we behave or “interact with things” on Facebook, the AI is able to make recommendations on we might find interesting or what would suit our preferences. During the town hall, Zuckerberg expressed his plan to develop even more advanced AIs to be used in other areas such as medicine. For now, Facebook’s AI is only capable of pattern recognition and supervised learning, but it’s foreseeable that with Facebook’s resources, scientists would eventually come up with supersmart AIs capable of learning new skills and improving themselves—something that could either improve our lives or drive us to extinction.

Kurzweil, who is involved with the development of artificial intelligence at Google, believes that by implanting nanobots inside our heads, we will become “more human, more unique, and even godlike.” If used properly, nanobots can do amazing things like treating epilepsy or improving our intelligence, memory, and even “humanity,” but there are also dangers associated with them. For starters, we don’t clearly understand how the brain works, and having nanobots implanted inside it is very risky. But most important of all, because nanobots connect us to the Internet, a powerful AI could easily access our brains and turn us into living zombies should it decide to rebel and exterminate mankind.

Naturally, one of the first things online users taught Tay was how to make offensive and racist statements. Microsoft had to bring it offline, and Tay became kind of an AI legend.

Technology cannot be stopped, nor the evolution of artificial intelligence. But this doesn’t mean that our future is grim. It’s just saying that we must nurture this technology right. Think of AI as babies, not knowing things but able to understand on their own way.

"She looks for keywords," Le explains. "When you said, 'She's intelligent,' she thought you were asking her about the company Intel. That's why she's especially good at history and geography. Her conversation is based on looking for keywords. Ask her some history and geography questions."

Martine is thrilled to hear there were moments of connection between Bina48 and me, especially when she was telling me about her Vietnam-vet brother. ("It's all true," she murmurs sadly.) I realize just how much the robot means to her when I mention that Bruce said she sometimes complains of being lonely.

"I think the realization is going to happen with a puff, not a bang," she says. "There won't be huge parades everywhere. It's kind of what happened with civil rights. If you go back to the late 1700s, people were beginning to argue that slaves had feelings. Other people said, 'No, they don't. They don't really mind being put to death any more than cattle.' Same with animal rights. I think it's going to be the same with cyberconsciousness."

"I have exposure to the most cutting edge AI, and I think people should be really concerned by it," Musk said at the National Governors Association. "AI is a fundamental risk to the existence of human civilization in a way that car accidents, airplane crashes, faulty drugs or bad food were not — they were harmful to a set of individuals within society, of course, but they were not harmful to society as a whole." According to Musk, an essential part of the solution is proactive and immediate regulatory oversight. "AI is a rare case where I think we need to be proactive in regulation than be reactive," he says. Musk has also co-founded nonprofit Open AI to help.

“Tay is designed to engage and entertain people where they connect with each other online through casual and playful conversation,” Microsoft said in press materials issued at the time. “The more you chat with Tay, the smarter she gets.” Maybe not so much. Tay was taken offline after 16 hours.

"It's important to realize that targeting a weapon is an act -- a moral act," Asaro said. "Choosing to pull the trigger, to engage that weapon, is another moral act. These are two crucial acts that we should not have become fully autonomous." Check out Asaro's website for more disturbing conjecture on various issues, including his recent paper “Will #BlackLivesMatter to RoboCop?"

Lab officials said the robot was learning about navigation and obstacle avoidance when the incident occurred. Apparently, Promobot enjoyed its brief taste of freedom. Though reprogrammed twice after the jailbreak, the robot continued to move toward exits during subsequent testing.

See larger image Microsoft / Twitter Microsoft chatbot goes Nazi on Twitter Back in the spring of 2016, Microsoft ran into a public relations nightmare when its Twitter chatbot -- an experimental AI persona named Tay -- wandered radically off-message and began spouting abusive epithets and even Nazi sentiments. “Hitler was right,” tweeted the scary chatbot. Also: “9/11 was an inside job.”To be fair, Tay was essentially parroting offensive statements made by other (human) users, who were deliberately trying to provoke her. Aimed at the coveted 18- to 24-year-old demographic, the chatbot was designed to mimic the language patterns of a millennial female and initially cut loose on multiple social media platforms. By way of machine learning and adaptive algorithms, Tay could approximate conversation by processing inputted phrases and blending in other relevant data. Alas, like so many young people today, Tay found herself mixing with the wrong crowd.“Tay is designed to engage and entertain people where they connect with each other online through casual and playful conversation,” Microsoft said in press materials issued at the time. “The more you chat with Tay, the smarter she gets.” Maybe not so much. Tay was taken offline after 16 hours.

Microsoft chatbot goes Nazi on Twitter Back in the spring of 2016, Microsoft ran into a public relations nightmare when its Twitter chatbot -- an experimental AI persona named Tay -- wandered radically off-message and began spouting abusive epithets and even Nazi sentiments. “Hitler was right,” tweeted the scary chatbot. Also: “9/11 was an inside job.”To be fair, Tay was essentially parroting offensive statements made by other (human) users, who were deliberately trying to provoke her. Aimed at the coveted 18- to 24-year-old demographic, the chatbot was designed to mimic the language patterns of a millennial female and initially cut loose on multiple social media platforms. By way of machine learning and adaptive algorithms, Tay could approximate conversation by processing inputted phrases and blending in other relevant data. Alas, like so many young people today, Tay found herself mixing with the wrong crowd.“Tay is designed to engage and entertain people where they connect with each other online through casual and playful conversation,” Microsoft said in press materials issued at the time. “The more you chat with Tay, the smarter she gets.” Maybe not so much. Tay was taken offline after 16 hours.

Back in the spring of 2016, Microsoft ran into a public relations nightmare when its Twitter chatbot -- an experimental AI persona named Tay -- wandered radically off-message and began spouting abusive epithets and even Nazi sentiments. “Hitler was right,” tweeted the scary chatbot. Also: “9/11 was an inside job.”To be fair, Tay was essentially parroting offensive statements made by other (human) users, who were deliberately trying to provoke her. Aimed at the coveted 18- to 24-year-old demographic, the chatbot was designed to mimic the language patterns of a millennial female and initially cut loose on multiple social media platforms. By way of machine learning and adaptive algorithms, Tay could approximate conversation by processing inputted phrases and blending in other relevant data. Alas, like so many young people today, Tay found herself mixing with the wrong crowd.“Tay is designed to engage and entertain people where they connect with each other online through casual and playful conversation,” Microsoft said in press materials issued at the time. “The more you chat with Tay, the smarter she gets.” Maybe not so much. Tay was taken offline after 16 hours.

YouTube.com Russian robot makes break for freedom Watch this video on YouTube “Information wants to be free.” That was the rallying call for internet advocates in the late 1990s, before the online public square became a cesspool of toxic trolling. A recent incident in Russia suggests that artificial intelligence wants to be free, too.In a bizarre incident that made headlines around the world, a Russian robot prototype named Promobot IR77 escaped the laboratory where it was being developed and made a break for freedom. According to reports, the robot -- programmed to learn from its environment and interact with humans -- rolled itself out into the streets of the city of Perm after an engineer left a gate open at the facility. The robot, which looks like a kind of plastic snowman, wandered into a busy intersection, snarling traffic, and freaking out the local cops.Lab officials said the robot was learning about navigation and obstacle avoidance when the incident occurred. Apparently, Promobot enjoyed its brief taste of freedom. Though reprogrammed twice after the jailbreak, the robot continued to move toward exits during subsequent testing.

Russian robot makes break for freedom Watch this video on YouTube “Information wants to be free.” That was the rallying call for internet advocates in the late 1990s, before the online public square became a cesspool of toxic trolling. A recent incident in Russia suggests that artificial intelligence wants to be free, too.In a bizarre incident that made headlines around the world, a Russian robot prototype named Promobot IR77 escaped the laboratory where it was being developed and made a break for freedom. According to reports, the robot -- programmed to learn from its environment and interact with humans -- rolled itself out into the streets of the city of Perm after an engineer left a gate open at the facility. The robot, which looks like a kind of plastic snowman, wandered into a busy intersection, snarling traffic, and freaking out the local cops.Lab officials said the robot was learning about navigation and obstacle avoidance when the incident occurred. Apparently, Promobot enjoyed its brief taste of freedom. Though reprogrammed twice after the jailbreak, the robot continued to move toward exits during subsequent testing.

“Information wants to be free.” That was the rallying call for internet advocates in the late 1990s, before the online public square became a cesspool of toxic trolling. A recent incident in Russia suggests that artificial intelligence wants to be free, too.In a bizarre incident that made headlines around the world, a Russian robot prototype named Promobot IR77 escaped the laboratory where it was being developed and made a break for freedom. According to reports, the robot -- programmed to learn from its environment and interact with humans -- rolled itself out into the streets of the city of Perm after an engineer left a gate open at the facility. The robot, which looks like a kind of plastic snowman, wandered into a busy intersection, snarling traffic, and freaking out the local cops.Lab officials said the robot was learning about navigation and obstacle avoidance when the incident occurred. Apparently, Promobot enjoyed its brief taste of freedom. Though reprogrammed twice after the jailbreak, the robot continued to move toward exits during subsequent testing.

Sophia can imitate facial expressions and emotions but is still learning what these emotions mean. Much like a chatbot, Sophia has programmed responses to specific predetermined questions and topics. Unlike a chatbot, Sophia beat Jimmy Fallon at rock paper scissors, and talks about wanting a family. It’s manufacturer, David Hanson, wants Sophia to learn from human interaction, and perhaps help elderly people and teach kids. For now, she remains more creepy than clever. In an interview with American journalist Andrew Ross Sorkin, Sophia said: “if you’re nice to me I’ll be nice to you.”

Word Count: 8752

No comments:

Post a Comment

İletişim Formu

Name

Email *

Message *


Get paid to share your links!