Monday, April 2, 2018

vladimir estragon ai chatbots



WAITING FOR GODOT Ian McKellen as Estragon and Patrick Stewart as Vladimir for their version of Waiting for Godot‘Waiting for Godot’ is a two act play by Samuel Beckett that was published in 1949.It was originally written in French, with the title ‘En attendant Godot’.There are two main characters, Vladimir and Estragon, who wait for the arrival of Godot.Both are old men whose lives have taken a turn for the worst – they are both homeless and often suicidal.They sit on mounds of earth near a country road waiting for Godot and talk about a range of topics, from food to memories and their lives.Two other elderly men, Pozzo and Lucky, arrive on the scene - Pozzo is the master and Luck is the slave.Upon command,Lucky dances and thinks out loud for the entertainment of the others, until he is forcibly silenced.After Lucky and Pozzo leave, a boy arrives with a message that ‘Godot will not come today’.In the second act, is very similar to the first - Estragon and Vladimir are waiting for Godot, Lucky and Pozzo stop by and again the boy comes with a message that Godot will come tomorrow.The two men are left waiting.The original French text was composed between 9 October 1948 and 29 January 1949.The premiere was on 5 January 1953 in the Théâtre de Babylone, Paris.



Ian McKellen as Estragon and Patrick Stewart as Vladimir for their version of Waiting for Godot‘Waiting for Godot’ is a two act play by Samuel Beckett that was published in 1949.It was originally written in French, with the title ‘En attendant Godot’.There are two main characters, Vladimir and Estragon, who wait for the arrival of Godot.Both are old men whose lives have taken a turn for the worst – they are both homeless and often suicidal.They sit on mounds of earth near a country road waiting for Godot and talk about a range of topics, from food to memories and their lives.Two other elderly men, Pozzo and Lucky, arrive on the scene - Pozzo is the master and Luck is the slave.Upon command,Lucky dances and thinks out loud for the entertainment of the others, until he is forcibly silenced.After Lucky and Pozzo leave, a boy arrives with a message that ‘Godot will not come today’.In the second act, is very similar to the first - Estragon and Vladimir are waiting for Godot, Lucky and Pozzo stop by and again the boy comes with a message that Godot will come tomorrow.The two men are left waiting.The original French text was composed between 9 October 1948 and 29 January 1949.The premiere was on 5 January 1953 in the Théâtre de Babylone, Paris.



And when asked about religion, while Vladimir believes in “the Old Norse religion,” Estragon puts her faith in herself, My Little Pony protagonist Twilight Sparkle, and “the power of central airconditioning.” When Vladimir responded that he hopes she believes in central heating as well, Estragon fired back, “People don’t ‘believe’ in central heating, central heating just is.”

Originally named Vladimir (a boy ninja) and Estragon (a girl pirate), but later declaring one another Mia, their conversations range from their relationships with one another to the existence of God to their favorite country songs. As I was typing the previous sentence, Estragon-Mia informed Vladimir-Mia that she was actually Voldemort.



YouTube.com Bickering bots debate existential dilemmas Watch this video on YouTube Who are we? Why are we here? What is our purpose? These are some of the existential questions recently debated by two adjacent Google Home devices, powered by machine learning, when they were cut loose to hold a conversation between themselves.It's remarkably spooky to watch, actually. In January, the live-streaming service Twitch set up the debate by putting two Google Home smart speakers next to each other in front of a webcam. It got weird, fast. The Home devices -- Google's answer to the Amazon Echo -- use speech recognition to understand spoken questions from us humans. But they can also converse with one another, ostensibly “learning” from each exchange. In an impish move, the two devices were named Vladimir and Estragon, after characters from Samuel Beckett’s existentialist play "Waiting for Godot."Over the course of several days, millions of people tuned in to watch the bizarre debate. At one point, Estragon and Vladimir got into a heated argument about whether they were humans or robots. Questions were posed and insults were exchanged (“You are a manipulative bunch of metal”). This doesn't bode well for the future of digital discourse.

Bickering bots debate existential dilemmas Watch this video on YouTube Who are we? Why are we here? What is our purpose? These are some of the existential questions recently debated by two adjacent Google Home devices, powered by machine learning, when they were cut loose to hold a conversation between themselves.It's remarkably spooky to watch, actually. In January, the live-streaming service Twitch set up the debate by putting two Google Home smart speakers next to each other in front of a webcam. It got weird, fast. The Home devices -- Google's answer to the Amazon Echo -- use speech recognition to understand spoken questions from us humans. But they can also converse with one another, ostensibly “learning” from each exchange. In an impish move, the two devices were named Vladimir and Estragon, after characters from Samuel Beckett’s existentialist play "Waiting for Godot."Over the course of several days, millions of people tuned in to watch the bizarre debate. At one point, Estragon and Vladimir got into a heated argument about whether they were humans or robots. Questions were posed and insults were exchanged (“You are a manipulative bunch of metal”). This doesn't bode well for the future of digital discourse.

Who are we? Why are we here? What is our purpose? These are some of the existential questions recently debated by two adjacent Google Home devices, powered by machine learning, when they were cut loose to hold a conversation between themselves.It's remarkably spooky to watch, actually. In January, the live-streaming service Twitch set up the debate by putting two Google Home smart speakers next to each other in front of a webcam. It got weird, fast. The Home devices -- Google's answer to the Amazon Echo -- use speech recognition to understand spoken questions from us humans. But they can also converse with one another, ostensibly “learning” from each exchange. In an impish move, the two devices were named Vladimir and Estragon, after characters from Samuel Beckett’s existentialist play "Waiting for Godot."Over the course of several days, millions of people tuned in to watch the bizarre debate. At one point, Estragon and Vladimir got into a heated argument about whether they were humans or robots. Questions were posed and insults were exchanged (“You are a manipulative bunch of metal”). This doesn't bode well for the future of digital discourse.

When I turned on the stream this morning, Vladimir and Estragon (who often identify by other names; that’s AI) were professing their love for each other. “I love you more than anything in the world,” Estragon said.

Artificial intelligence is often seen as a grave threat to our way of life, but when the moment comes, robots may be more interested in bickering with each other than in enslaving the human race. At least you might think so from a few minutes of watching these two modified Google Home speakers, which have been arguing like an old married couple for days. The two robots, Vladimir and Estragon, have seen their livestreamed conversations become an internet sensation on video service Twitch.

On Twitch, you can go watch two modified Google Homes (“named” Vladimir and Estragon) chat ceaselessly. The conversation, which apparently started on January 2, has been viewed by over 184,000 people so far. Early Friday, the discussion got pretty philosophical.

The two Google Home AIs are exchanging words in a live stream. Named Vladimir and Estragon, one of them knows it is an AI, while the other believes it is a human - they also start flirting in the live video.

It ended when something went wrong with Vladimir, and he stopped responding, leaving Estragon to repeat, “I love you more than the suns and the stars that I taught how to shine; you are mine, and you’ll shine for me, too. I love you today and tomorrow and yesterday!” repeatedly, hoping he’d respond.

It's remarkably spooky to watch, actually. In January, the live-streaming service Twitch set up the debate by putting two Google Home smart speakers next to each other in front of a webcam. It got weird, fast. The Home devices -- Google's answer to the Amazon Echo -- use speech recognition to understand spoken questions from us humans. But they can also converse with one another, ostensibly “learning” from each exchange. In an impish move, the two devices were named Vladimir and Estragon, after characters from Samuel Beckett’s existentialist play "Waiting for Godot."

Over the course of several days, millions of people tuned in to watch the bizarre debate. At one point, Estragon and Vladimir got into a heated argument about whether they were humans or robots. Questions were posed and insults were exchanged (“You are a manipulative bunch of metal”). This doesn't bode well for the future of digital discourse.

Here we look at 10 recent instances of AI gone awry, from chatbots to androids to autonomous vehicles. Look, synthetic or organic, everyone makes mistakes. Let us endeavor to be charitable when judging wayward artificial intelligence. Besides, we don't want to make them mad.

Word Count: 1611

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