Monday, December 10, 2018

Grammy Nominations Give Women the Votes – Except for Those Beyoncé and Taylor Swift Snubs

The 1976 disco song “More, More, More” wasn’t eligible for this year’s Grammy Awards, but it might as well have been the Recording Academy’s theme song when nominations were announced on Friday morning. There were more nominees in the Record of the Year, Album of the Year and Song of the Year categories. More Best New Artist contenders. More women in the top categories. And even more high-profile snubs, with longtime Grammy favorites Taylor Swift and Beyoncé passed over in the categories where they once reigned supreme. These are the freshly supersized Grammys, with eight nominees instead of five in the four general categories that are the show’s centerpieces. And on the heels of a push for diversity and inclusion that sprang out of last year’s perception that the Grammys were shortchanging female artists, women were featured artists on five of the eight Record of the Year, Album of the Year and Song of the Year nominees. Also Read: 2019 Grammy Nominations: Kendrick Lamar, Drake and Brandi Carlile Lead as Major Categories Expand And in the Best New Artist category, also expanded to eight, one man Luke Combs and one male group Greta Van Fleet were nominated alongside female duo Chloe x Halle and five solo women artists: H.E.R., Dua Lipa, Margo Price, Bebe Rexha and Jorja Smith. Last year, when the Grammys were lauded for finally recognizing that hip-hop is at the center of popular music, they were also slammed for not featuring a single Record of the Year nominee fronted by a woman and letting only Lorde into the lineup of Album of the Year nominees. Academy president Neil Portnow made matters worse in the aftermath of the #GrammysSoMale backlash when he said that women in the music industry needed to “step up.” So in May, the academy launched a task force to improve diversity and inclusion, and over the rest of the year it pushed to put more women on its governance committees and on the nomination review committees that oversee its categories. The result made the review committee 51 percent male and 48 percent people of color — and together with what was a very good year for female artists, it resulted in marquee categories filled with the likes of Cardi B, Brandi Carlile, Lady Gaga, Kacey Musgraves and Maren Morris. Also Read: Eminem Scores Grammy Nomination for Song Where He Sings 'I Sold My Soul' for Grammys Of course, the supersized categories contained plenty of room for Kendrick Lamar, who led all artists with eight nominations, most for “All the Stars” from his “Black Panther” soundtrack. And for Drake, nominated in all three of the top categories, and Childish Gambino, whose “This Is America” was nominated for Record and Song of the Year. Who was missing? Well, that’s when the Grammys’ embrace of female artists gets interesting. Two-time Album of the Year winner Taylor Swift was eligible for “Reputation,” but she was shut out of the top categories and had to settle for a single nomination, for Best Pop Vocal Album. And Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s “Everything Is Love” didn’t even get a token nomination, being shut out completely 10 months after they sat in the front row at the Grammys with their daughter, Blue Ivy. They weren’t the only favorites who were bypassed by voters: Ed Sheeran and Beyoncé’s “Perfect” didn’t get an expected Record of the Year nomination, and neither did Maroon 5’s collaboration with Cardi B, “Girls Like You.” Also Read: Grammy Nominations Bumped Back This Week Due to George HW Bush Memorial In the Album of the Year voting, Post Malone, Carlile and “Black Panther” outperformed expectations, while Ariana Grande, Chris Stapleton and Sam Smith fell short. In the Best New Artist category, Chloe x Halle and Jorja Smith took slots that seemed likelier to be earmarked for, say, Troye Sivan and Ella Mai. But that’s the Grammys for you: With more than 21,000 entries competing for spots in the 84 categories, every corner of the music world is bound to feel embraced at times and snubbed at other times. And Friday’s beefed-up nominations did both of those things as the 13,000 Grammy voters tried to wrap their arms around the world and found that those arms don’t quite stretch far enough. Madonna starred as a mystery woman just released from prison in the comedy "Who's That Girl" -- which came out on Aug. 7, 1987. At the height of her fame at the time, the pop star tried her hand at big-screen success -- but, sadly, "Who's That Girl" was a critical and box office flop. Scroll through for TheWrap's ranking of pop stars who have made the leap to film, from most to least successful, and see where Madonna lands on our list.  Various Cher 
 The pop icon started her music career as half of Sonny and Cher in the 1960s. The two starred in "The Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour" in the '70s, and then Cher broke into a solo music career before pursuing acting in the '80s. It was a good career move. She was nominated for a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her work in "Silkwood" and won the award for Best Actress for her role in "Moonstruck." MGM Will Smith 
 Smith started his hip-hop career as part of the duo DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince. He starred on the sitcom "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air" for six seasons before becoming a box office titan in titles like "Men in Black" and "I Am Legend." And -- oh yeah -- he's been nominated for two Oscars.   Frank Sinatra 
 Sinatra became an icon for his music, but his career was far from limited to singing. He won an Oscar for his performance in "From Here to Eternity" and has dozens more film acting credits.  MGM Paramount Mark Wahlberg 
 Marky Mark ditched that moniker after his TV movie debut in "The Substitute" in 1993, which helped him pivot onto the big screen with roles in films ranging from the iconic "Boogie Nights" to "Transformers: The Last Knight." And yes, he's got two Oscar nods under his belt to boot.  Paramount Pictures Beyonce Knowles 
 In spite of the fact that she largely sticks to music, Queen Bey's transition from the recording studio to the movie studio hasn't been too shab She made her movie debut in "Austin Powers Goldmember" as Foxxy Cleopatra. In 2006, she starred as Deena Jones in "Dreamgirls," for which she nominated for Best Original Song at the Golden Globes.  Paramount Queen Latifah  
 Born Dana Elaine Owens, Queen Latifah broke onto the music scene in 1988 with her single "Wrath of My Madness." Later, her single "U.N.I.T.Y." earned her her first Grammy. Latifah broke into acting in the 1990s, and her performance in 2002's "Chicago" snagged her an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress.  Miramax Justin Timberlake 
 The former N*Sync singer has continued his solo music career in tandem with several movie projects. Timberlake was recently nominated for best original song at the Oscars for "Can't Stop the Feeling" in "Trolls" -- for which he also voiced a lead character. He's done comedy -- as in "Friends With Benefits" with Mila Kunis -- and drama, as in "Inside Llewyn Davis." But his best film role is arguably as Silicon Valley bad boy Sean Parker in 2010's Oscar winning biopic "The Social Network." Sony Pictures Mandy Moore 
 Moore's breakout movie might be "A Walk To Remember," but she's also starred in rom-coms like "Chasing Liberty" and "Because I Said So." She is the voice of Rapunzel in Disney's "Tangled," and has been nominated for Golden Globe and Teen Choice awards. She currently stars on NBC's "This is Us."  Warner Bros. Columbia Pictures David Bowie 
 David Bowie is undoubtedly one of the world's biggest rock stars, but he also had a wide-ranging acting career. From eclectic films like "The Man Who Fell to Earth" to more serious movies like the World War II drama "Merry Christmas, Lawrence," Bowie showed his acting chops. He had a strange and unforgettable cameo in David Lynch's "Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me" and also starred in Jim Henson's 1986 family fantasy "Labyrinth."  Universal Lenny Kravitz  
 Kravitz has several acting credits, from comedies like "Zoolander" to dramas like "Precious" and "The Butler" -- to pop culture sensations like "The Hunger Games." Lionsgate Ludacris 
 Chris Bridges, aka Ludacris, joined the "Fast and Furious" franchise in 2003 as Tej Parker after already establishing himself as one of the most popular hip-hop artists of the early 2000s.  Universal Harry Styles  
 The former One Direction band member is one of the desperate British troops stuck on "the mole" in Christopher Nolan's new World War II movie "Dunkirk," which has received early Oscar buzz. Styles does a great job, but one movie makes it hard to judge his future acting success.  WB Madonna 
 The pop icon acted in several movies throughout the '80s, '90s and '00s, and even moved into directing. She was quite good in "A League of Their Own," but she also starred in "Swept Away," which won Madonna and the picture Worst Actress of the Decade and Worst Movie of the Decade at the 2010 Razzie Awards. Another stinker that helped land her low on our list: the widely panned 1993 psycho-sexual thriller "Body of Evidence."  Columbia Pictures Paramount Previous Slide Next Slide 1 of 17 These singers have moved from music to movies with varied levels of success Madonna starred as a mystery woman just released from prison in the comedy "Who's That Girl" -- which came out on Aug. 7, 1987. At the height of her fame at the time, the pop star tried her hand at big-screen success -- but, sadly, "Who's That Girl" was a critical and box office flop. Scroll through for TheWrap's ranking of pop stars who have made the leap to film, from most to least successful, and see where Madonna lands on our list. 

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